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Research has found a link between testosterone therapy and an increased risk of heart attack. Read our blog to learn about the risks and benefits of TT.
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Is testosterone therapy right for you?

Testosterone has been described as man’s fountain of youth, which may explain why prescriptions for testosterone therapy, or TT, have tripled in the past 10 years.

Testosterone patches, gels or injections are approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat males with hypogonadism, a condition in which the male sex glands, or gonads, produce little or no sex hormones. Hypogonadism can be caused by age, belly fat, drugs, Type 2 diabetes or chemicals such as bisphenol A, which is found in plastics.

Because TT increases muscle mass in older males – and now is widely advertised on television – it’s also being prescribed for men with normal testosterone levels and, in some cases, with no testosterone testing at all.

Yet research is finding a link between testosterone therapy and an increased risk of heart attack. A study funded by the National Cancer Institute tracked nearly 55,600 elderly and middle-aged men treated with TT between 2008 and 2010.

The study specifically looked at the men’s rate of myocardial infarction in the year before receiving their prescription for testosterone therapy and in the three-month period after starting the treatment.

The rate of MI doubled in males 65 and older and in men younger than 65 with a history of coronary artery disease. The study found no increased risk in younger males with no history of coronary artery disease.

The cohort study also compared men using TT to a separate group of older or middle-age males who took Viagra or Cialis. In the latter group, no increase in the rate of heart attack was noted.

After the study was published, the FDA issued a warning that testosterone products have been associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Large-scale trials are needed to fully evaluate the risks and benefits of testosterone therapies. But in the meantime, patients should talk with their health care providers about the potential cardiovascular risks involved with TT, especially men 65 or older or with a history of coronary artery disease.

Men also can work to raise their testosterone levels by:

Testosterone has been described as man’s fountain of youth, which may explain why prescriptions for testosterone therapy, or TT, have tripled in the past 10 years.
  • Losing weight
  • Exercising routinely
  • Quitting smoking
  • Consuming less alcohol
  • Eating cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, bok choy and cabbage

Each of these remedies has been shown to both increase testosterone levels and decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. If you have questions about TT or need help with lifestyle changes, a Providence provider can help. Find one in your region here.

Categories: Aging Well, Men's Health
Research has found a link between testosterone therapy and an increased risk of heart attack. Read our blog to learn about the risks and benefits of TT.

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