It’s Time to Reconnect—and Help Others Do the Same

It’s Time to Reconnect—and Help Others Do the Same

Aphasia robs you of the ability to communicate. Often the result of a stroke or head injury, the condition can make it difficult to speak or understand language.

Our Providence St. Jude speech-language pathologists are experts in strategies and therapies to help those with aphasia improve their ability to communicate and their quality of life. Our communication groups, led by our speech-language pathologists, allow anyone affected by aphasia to challenge themselves, improve conversational skills, and reconnect with others.

To keep the groups affordable and open to all who need them, our speech therapists train volunteers to help. As a volunteer, you’ll learn key communication techniques and become a trained conversation partner. The connections you develop may be as meaningful to you as the person you help.

Communication groups meet on Monday mornings. If someone you love is affected by aphasia—or you’d like to become part of this essential program as a trained volunteer—please call us at 714-992-3000 ext. 1604. 

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