Robotic-Assisted Hip Surgery Now Available at Queen of the Valley

Robotic-Assisted Hip Surgery Now Available at Queen of the Valley

Providence Queen of the Valley Medical Center recently began offering a minimally-invasive option for hip replacement surgery as part of its orthopedics program. Michael Caravelli, M.D., performed the first robotic-assisted hip surgery using the MAKO technology earlier this year. 

“For more than 18 months, surgeons at Queen of the Valley have used this operating system to perform knee surgery. We are now thrilled to be able to extend this minimally-invasive option to patients in need of a hip replacement,” said Terry Wooten, chief executive.

Mako surgery has been proven to reduce blood loss and dislocation of the hip joint. In addition, it more accurately places and aligns the hip, creating a more natural replication of the individual’s natural anatomy.

Robotic-assisted hip surgery may benefit individuals with severe hip pain or stiffness resulting from noninflammatory degenerative joint disease (including osteoarthritis, traumatic arthritis, or avascular necrosis), rheumatoid arthritis or post-traumatic arthritis. It also may help those who haven’t experienced adequate relief with other treatment options, like bracing, medication or joint fluid supplements.

“My main goal is to liberate my patients from any limitations caused by their joint pain,” said Dr. Caravelli.“With robotic surgery, we are able to predictibly reproduce a patient’s anatomy and give them a joint replacement that is uniquely their own, allowing them to get back to doing the things they love, faster.”

Prior to Mako surgery, a CT scan of a patient’s hip joint is taken and uploaded into the Mako System where a virtual 3D model of the patient’s bone anatomy is created. During the surgery, the 3D model serves as a roadmap that can be referenced and adjusted if necessary. By controlling the Mako’s robotic-arm, the surgeon can expertly remove damaged bone and cartilage within the pre-defined area and align the hip implant and precisely position it in place.

To learn more about Queen of the Valley’s orthopedics program, visit providence.org/queen.