Providence's B.J. Moore Announced as a 2022 Finalist for the National CIO of the YEAR ORBIE Award

Providence's B.J. Moore Announced as a 2022 Finalist for the National CIO of the YEAR ORBIE Award

The National ORBIE Awards announced on July 28th that B.J. Moore as a 2022 Finalist for the National CIO of the YEAR ORBIE Award. The CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards is the premier technology executive recognition program in the United States. The ORBIE honors chief information officers who have demonstrated excellence in technology leadership. Finalists and winners are selected by an independent peer review process, led by prior ORBIE recipients, based upon:

• Leadership and management effectiveness

• Business value created by technology innovation

• Engagement in industry and community endeavors

B.J. is the chief information officer and executive vice president of real estate strategy and operations for Providence. He leads information services to support and enable Providence to achieve its vision of health for a better world. Following his leadership, the Providence information system team focuses on digital transformation defined by three pillars: simplify, modernize and innovate.

This includes partnering with leading organizations in areas such as cloud computing and artificial intelligence. B.J. has an extensive background in leading initiatives for digital transformation, enterprise cloud services, strategic planning, operational strategy and analysis, and guiding large-scale projects and teams.

Congratulations, B.J. for your innovative approach to streamlining information systems before the COVID-19 crisis and your leadership throughout these unprecedented times.

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