Total Hip Replacement

Joint pain can interfere with your movement and hinder you from accomplishing daily tasks. At Providence, we work with you to get you back on the move and enjoying life’s essential activities without the burden of joint pain.

In a total hip replacement, a highly polished prosthesis is used to replace damaged cartilage and bone. These prosthetics, also known as artificial joints, are primarily made of metal, ceramic and plastic. They are designed to duplicate the hip function as well as work compatibly with the body and resist corrosion.

There are two primary surgical approach options for hip replacement: posterior and anterior. The anterior approach allows a surgeon to reach the hip joint from the front of the body with a small 3-to-4 inch incision. This allows for preservation of muscle around the hip, resulting in faster recovery times and minimal pain.

The posterior approach is the most commonly used approach. The posterior approach minimizes muscle dissection and preserves hip flexor muscles, all while avoiding contact with anterior nerve structures. Your surgeon will provide you with a recommendation as to whether you are best suited for an anterior or posterior hip procedure based on your particular situation.

During the procedure, your surgeon will make an incision over your hip to remove all diseased and damaged bone and cartilage. They will then replace it with the artificial joint. The result is a more natural-feeling, nearly pain-free gliding surface for your hip joint. The operation typically takes an hour and you can begin walking the same day.

We offer a preoperative patient education program about total joint surgery where patients can learn about the exercises that will help them recover and smoothly transition back to their normal day-to-day routine.

Over 98% of hip replacement patients do not experience complications. Still, some may arise depending on your specific health conditions. These possible complications include infection, blood clots in the legs, dislocation or loosening of the hip joint, nerve injuries, fractures, or a change in leg length.