Providence Spokane Neuroscience Institute expands with new providers, services

 
 
Providence Spokane Neuroscience Institute is expanding its nationally recognized stroke and cognitive care program with the addition of new providers and services in Spokane. This will help meet the growing needs of our community as people age.  
 
New Specialty
Providence is now offering more specialized care for people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or those with other cognitive challenges. The Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive care program is led by Dr. Silvia Russo, a behavioral health neurologist who is an expert in Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and other brain impairments. 
 
Dr. Russo will partner with Dr. Danielle Wald, a licensed psychologist and clinical neuropsychologist at Providence Neuroscience Institute.
 
Additional Stroke Clinicians
Providence is also adding two new clinicians to further enhance stroke care, working in collaboration with specialists at Providence-Swedish in Seattle.  
 
Dr. Meghan Srinivas is a fellowship-trained vascular specialist who completed her medical education and residency at Navodaya Medical College. 
 
Alba Carpenter is an advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) with extensive experience in neuroscience critical care with a focus on treating stroke patients.  
 
Dr. Russo, Dr. Srinivas, and Carpenter are accepting new patients through referral at Providence Stroke and Cognitive Care Center, part of Providence Spokane Neuroscience Institute.
 
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